Dear 43 Things Users,

10 years after introducing 43 Things to the world, we have decided we have met our last goal: completing the incredible experience that has been 43 Things. Please join us in giving one last cheer to all the folks who have shared their goals with the world, as well as all the people who have worked at The Robot Co-op to build this incredible website. We won a Webby Award, published a book, and brought happiness to a lot of people.

Starting today, 43 Things users can export their goals and entries from the site. Starting August 15, we will make the site “read only”. 43 Things users will still be able to view the site and export their content, but we won’t be taking any new content from users. We hope to leave the site up for folks to see and download their content until the end of the year. Ending on New Year’s Eve takes us full circle.

It has been a long ride (one of our original goals was to "build a company that lasts at least 2 years” - we beat that one!) While we wish the site could live on, it has suffered from a number of challenges - changes in how people use the site, the advertising industry, and how search engines view the site. We wish the outcome was different – but we’ve always been realistic about when our goals are met and when they aren't.

As of today, you will be able to download your goals and entries. See more about that on the FAQ page. Thanks for 10 great years of goal-setting and achieving.

- The Robots.

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amygda7a




I'm doing 41 things
 

amygda7a's Life List

  1. 1. be an excellent psychotherapist
    1 entry . 4 cheers
    1 person
  2. 2. pass the EPPP with at least a 75%
    2 entries . 1 cheer
    1 person
  3. 3. become a licensed psychologist
    7 cheers
    2 people
  4. 4. publish two more book chapters or articles in peer reviewed journals
    8 entries . 9 cheers
    1 person
  5. 5. be more at home in a position of authority and collegial equality
    1 entry . 3 cheers
    1 person
  6. 6. complete my fellowship having achieved my primary goal of becoming confident and competent to practice independently (while also developing/ retaining a range of skills and specialties)
    2 cheers
    1 person
  7. 7. explore the region where I live
    2 cheers
    1 person
  8. 8. have a garden
    2 entries . 9 cheers
    883 people
  9. 9. Complete psychoanalytic training
    3 entries . 1 cheer
    1 person
  10. 10. complete psychoanalysis
    1 cheer
    1 person
  11. 11. try all the yoga studios within an hour of where I live
    2 entries . 1 cheer
    1 person
  12. 12. run 10k
    2 entries . 3 cheers
    142 people
  13. 13. keep writing
    1 cheer
    26 people
  14. 14. become more film literate
    1 entry . 1 cheer
    1 person
  15. 15. develop my singing voice
    12 people
  16. 16. write a book
    1 entry . 14 cheers
    31,381 people
  17. 17. Keep a Learning Journal
    1 entry . 1 cheer
    2 people
  18. 18. Visit Japan with my husband
    3 cheers
    1 person
  19. 19. Re-achieve old goals that I've let slip/ repeat achieved goals that deserve repetition
    1 entry . 5 cheers
    1 person
  20. 20. Complete my clean-sweep program
    1 entry . 4 cheers
    3 people
  21. 21. tie up loose ends
    2 cheers
    19 people
  22. 22. Read Jacques Lacan
    1 entry
    2 people
  23. 23. travel the world
    2 cheers
    21,175 people
  24. 24. Save $50,000
    1 entry . 2 cheers
    48 people
  25. 25. receive ABPP Board Certification
    1 entry . 1 cheer
    1 person
  26. 26. create a sourdough starter
    1 entry . 2 cheers
    13 people
  27. 27. make tofu from scratch
    2 cheers
    4 people
  28. 28. make my own soy/ almond/ rice milk
    2 cheers
    1 person
  29. 29. make my own ginger ale
    1 person
  30. 30. bake bread
    3 cheers
    172 people
  31. 31. learn home canning
    1 cheer
    15 people
  32. 32. make mozerella cheese
    1 cheer
    2 people
  33. 33. learn some mode of artistic expression (photography, pottery, an instrument, voice, rap, performance art, dance, creative writing, collage...)
    3 cheers
    1 person
  34. 34. make a list of skills/ practical know-how I'd like to learn, and learn 1 per week
    1 entry . 1 cheer
    1 person
  35. 35. Take the Mensa test.
    1,002 people
  36. 36. pursue special certifications in family therapy/ couples therapy, child and adolescent analysis, collaborative assessment, sex therapy, lgbtq competency, organizational consultation, group consultation, group therapy
    4 entries . 1 cheer
    1 person
  37. 37. learn kettlebell
    1 person
  38. 38. float in an isolation tank.
    2 cheers
    12 people
  39. 39. have a massage in my home
    1 person
  40. 40. weigh 115 pounds
    215 people
  41. 41. dedicate 1-2 2 hour blocks/ week to writing
    1 person
  42. 42. Undergo Rolfing
    1 cheer
    1 person

How I did it
How to make cupcakes
It took me
1 day
It made me


How to volunteer for planned parenthood
It took me
1 week
It made me
righteous


How to do more bikram yoga
It took me
1 week
It made me
hot


See all "How I Did It" stories...

Recent entries
Bid a fond farewell to this site in the old style
Farewell.

I have been on 43 Things since my tumultuous last semester in college in 2004. The site has helped me thoughtfully direct myself through college graduation, post-college job searching, applying to graduate school (“Apply to my desired graduate psychology programs”), writing my dissertation, completing graduate school, getting married, beginning my first postdoctoral position, as well as doing what matters to me (“become a better therapist”), setting aspirations (“Act purposively and honestly, consistently”) and going on (“survive this semester,” “Don’t Give Up”). In addition to the major life goals, I’ve used the site to work on living day to day and month to month the life I want to live (“take sleep seriously,” “listen to more music; find a new album every month”). For a while, being on 43T encouraged me to rack up a list of adventures and experiences (“shoot a gun,” “jump out of a plane”), skills (“learn knife skills,” “learn CPR and First Aid,” “learn html”), accomplishments (“get a teaching award”), and to dream even if I never completed the goal (“attend a 10-day Vipassana retreat”). I connected with like-minded goal setters around shared aims (“Do the Couch to 5k running plan”) and advised others who wanted to follow paths I’d taken (“go to St. John’s College”). The site has been orienting, encouraging, focusing if at times a bit of an obsessional solution to pin down the ambiguity of life, during a period when I particularly needed developmental scaffolding into the beginning of my adult life. I have used it less as my goals become more ongoing and my life becomes more stable, but return to it as a kind of teddy bear, checking in on and tracking occasional markers of steady progress on longer and some potentially lifelong goals. I think, though, I am ready to let go of the transitional function 43T has held for me, to need less external structure to affirm what I’m doing and what I’ve done, and to be less concerned with stabilizing my identity as a do-er and simply to do (or even to be)/ to live my goals. Thank you, robots, for providing me with a container in which to grow.



Say Goodbye to 43 Things.
Goodbye.

I have been on 43 Things since my tumultuous last semester in college in 2004. The site has helped me thoughtfully direct myself through college graduation, post-college job searching, applying to graduate school (“Apply to my desired graduate psychology programs”), writing my dissertation, completing graduate school, getting married, beginning my first postdoctoral position, as well as doing what matters to me (“become a better therapist”), setting aspirations (“Act purposively and honestly, consistently”) and going on (“survive this semester,” “Don’t Give Up”). In addition to the major life goals, I’ve used the site to work on living day to day and month to month the life I want to live (“take sleep seriously,” “listen to more music; find a new album every month”). For a while, being on 43T encouraged me to rack up a list of adventures and experiences (“shoot a gun,” “jump out of a plane”), skills (“learn knife skills,” “learn CPR and First Aid,” “learn html”), accomplishments (“get a teaching award”), and to dream even if I never completed the goal (“attend a 10-day Vipassana retreat”). I connected with like-minded goal setters around shared aims (“Do the Couch to 5k running plan”) and advised others who wanted to follow paths I’d taken (“go to St. John’s College”). The site has been orienting, encouraging, focusing if at times a bit of an obsessional solution to pin down the ambiguity of life, during a period when I particularly needed developmental scaffolding into the beginning of my adult life. I have used it less as my goals become more ongoing and my life becomes more stable, but return to it as a kind of teddy bear, checking in on and tracking occasional markers of steady progress on longer and some potentially lifelong goals. I think, though, I am ready to let go of the transitional function 43T has held for me, to need less external structure to affirm what I’m doing and what I’ve done, and to be less concerned with stabilizing my identity as a do-er and simply to do (or even to be)/ to live my goals. Thank you, robots, for providing me with a container in which to grow.



become more film literate
Untitled

http://www.sjc.edu/events-and-programs/santa-fe/summer-film-institute/



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